Do I Need a Storm Door?

Do I Need a Storm Door?

Storm doors play a vital role for homeowners, providing an extra layer of protection during storms and hot or cold weather as well as a method of increased ventilation during the summer months. However, they aren’t necessary for everyone. If you’ve ever wondered if you need a storm door, then it’s important to understand what they are, how they function and what kind of homes can benefit.

What Is the Purpose of a Storm Door?

A storm door is a secondary door placed on the exterior of a front, back or side door that leads to the outside. This door acts as a form of protection during inclement weather, further sealing your home against cold air and creating a pocket of insulation between the doors.

For those in frigid climates, this can be a way to lower energy bills by reducing the need for excessive heating to combat cold airflow into the home. Furthermore, storm doors can protect standard doors from weather damage caused by excessive rain or snow that could lead to an expensive replacement.

The name can imply that storm doors are effectively useless during the summer or when the weather isn’t brutal, but this isn’t true. Millions of homes across America are equipped with storm doors due to the benefits available throughout the year. Many storm doors come with panels that can be switched out; glass can be used in the winter as a protective barrier with the option to transition to a screen door in the summer for increased airflow.

Storm doors are also ideal for keeping warm and cold air indoors, and those that don’t have a replaceable panel are an excellent source of sunlight year-round.

When to Install a Storm Door in Your Home

Whether you need a storm door depends on various factors, from climate to home construction to simple personal preferences. You may choose to install a storm door in your home if:

  • You live in a cold climate or a part of the country that experiences a traditional winter season. Storm doors can prevent cold air from entering a home, saving on utility bills and creating a more comfortable environment. Storm doors can also protect wooden doors from water damage during heavy rain or snow.
  • You want a screen door in the summer. While it’s possible to install a screen door, many homeowners prefer the dual functionality of a storm door, especially in areas where the weather can be potentially damaging. Screen doors can allow fresh air in while keeping insects and other pests out.
  • You have an old home that’s not energy efficient. Many new structures are designed with energy efficiency in mind, but the technology available today hasn’t always been an option. An older home may need additional measures to lower energy bills or maintain a comfortable temperature.
  • You like the look of storm doors. Some storm doors are attractive and can add a nice touch to the exterior of a home. Even if the primary purpose of a storm door isn’t relevant, a storm door can still be a nice aesthetic.

Despite the advantages, not all homes benefit from the installation of a storm door, including homeowners who:

  • Live in a climate that’s warm or humid all year and don’t rely on air conditioning
  • Don’t like the appearance of storm doors
  • Live in an energy-efficient home with sufficient seals to prevent against cold or hot air
  • Have a front door that’s unlikely to be damaged by rain, snow or hail

Storm doors can be a valuable investment for homeowners of all kinds, offering protection from inclement weather and lowering energy bills. However, they aren’t the right fit for everyone. Before installing a storm door, be sure it’s the right fit for your local climate and energy needs.

Contact Us Today for More Information 

If you are wondering if you need a storm door, Thompson Creek Windows can help. From quotes to professional advice, we can help you make the best possible decisions for your home. Contact us today for a free price estimate.

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